Cogeneration Technologies
An EcoGeneration Solutions LLC. Company
E-mail:  info @ cogeneration .net
Cooler, Cleaner, Greener Power & Energy Solutions 

Home | Contact Us | Links

 
 

Carbon Dioxide Credits
www.CarbonDioxideCredits.com

 






To advertise on this site, call or email
The Renewable Energy Institute

email:  info@RenewableEnergyInstitute.org

 

Carbon Dioxide Credits

and
Certified Emission Reduction Credits
under the Kyoto Protocol's Clean Development Mechanism

What is a Certified Emission Reduction?

A Certified Emission Reduction (CERs) is the technical term for the output of Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects, as defined by the Kyoto Protocol. A unit of Greenhouse Gas reductions that has been generated and certified under the provisions of Article 12 of the Kyoto Protocol,  the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). In contrast, Emissions Reduction Units (ERUs) are used for Joint Implementation (JI) under Article 6 of the Protocol. According to Article 12, CERs must be "certified by operational entities to be designated by the Conference of the Parties (COP) serving as the Meeting of the Parties (MOP).

What is "Global Warming Potential?"

Global Warming Potential (GWP) is the system of multipliers developed to enable warming effects of different gases to be compared. The cumulative warming effect, over a specified time period, of an emission of a mass unit of CO2 is assigned the value of 1. Effects of emissions of a mass unit of non-CO2 greenhouse gases are estimated as multiples. For example, over the next 100 years, a gram of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere is currently estimated as having 23 times the warming effect as a gram of carbon dioxide; methane's 100-year GWP is thus 23. Estimates of GWP vary depending on the time-scale considered (e.g., 20-, 50-, or 100-year GWP), because the effects of some GHGs are more persistent than others.

GWP has also been expressed as the instantaneous radiative forcing that results from the addition of 1 kilogram of a gas to the atmosphere, relative to that of 1 kilogram of carbon dioxide. Over a time horizon of 100 years, methane has a GWP of 24.5, nitrous oxide has a GWP of 320, and CFC-11 has a GWP of 4,000.

What Are Greenhouse Gases?

Some greenhouse gases occur naturally in the atmosphere, while others result from human activities. Naturally occurring greenhouse gases include water vapor,
carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and ozone. Certain human activities, however, add to the levels of most of these naturally occurring gases:

Carbon dioxide is released to the atmosphere when solid waste, fossil fuels (oil, natural gas, and coal), and wood and wood products are burned. 

Methane is emitted during the production and transport of coal, natural gas, and oil. Methane emissions also result from the decomposition of organic wastes in municipal solid waste landfills, and the raising of livestock. More information on methane.

Nitrous oxide is emitted during agricultural and industrial activities, as well as during combustion of solid waste and fossil fuels. 

Very powerful greenhouse gases that are not naturally occurring include hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which are generated in a variety of industrial processes.

Global Warming Potentials and Atmospheric Lifetimes (Years)

Gas

Atmospheric Lifetime

GWPa

Carbon dioxide (CO2)

50-200

1

Methane (CH4)b

123

21

Nitrous oxide (N2O)

120

310

HFC-23

264

11,700

HFC-32

5.6

650

HFC-125

32.6

2,800

HFC-134a

14.6

1,300

HFC-143a

48.3

3,800

HFC-152a

1.5

140

HFC-227ea

36.5

2,900

HFC-236fa

209

6,300

HFC-4310mee

17.1

1,300

CF4

50,000

6,500

C2F6

10,000

9,200

C4F10

2,600

7,000

C6F14

3,200

7,400

SF6

3,200

23,900


a 100 year time horizon
b The methane GWP includes the direct effects and those indirect effects due to the production of tropospheric ozone and stratospheric water vapor. The indirect effect due to the production of CO2 is not included.

For more information call:  832  - 758 - 0027

We provide turnkey services that removes Nitrogen Oxides, Nitrous Oxides and Sulfur Oxides. Unlike most companies, we are equipment supplier/vendor neutral. This means we help our clients select the best equipment for their specific application. This approach provides our customers with superior performance, decreased operating expenses and increased return on investment. Selective Catalytic Reduction systems are frequently used in removing NOx.

Our company provides turn-key project solutions that include all or part of the following: 

  • Engineering and Economic Feasibility Studies 

  • Project Design, Engineering & Permitting

  • Project Construction

  • Project Funding & Financing Options

  • Shared/Guaranteed Savings program with no capital requirements. 

  • Project Commissioning 

  • Operations & Maintenance 

For more information: call us at: 832-758-0027

What are Nitrogen Oxides?

Nitrogen oxides, or NOx, is the generic term for a group of highly reactive gases, all of which contain nitrogen and oxygen in varying amounts. Many of the nitrogen oxides are colorless and odorless. However, one common pollutant, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) along with particles in the air can often be seen as a reddish-brown layer over many urban areas.

Nitrogen oxides form when fuel is burned at high temperatures, as in a combustion process. The primary sources of NOx are motor vehicles, electric utilities, and other industrial, commercial, and residential sources that burn fuels.

Motor Vehicles, 49%; Utilities, 27%; Industrial/Commercial/Residential, 19%; All Other Sources, 5%

Reasons for Concern

Plant ImageNitrogen Oxides:

  • are one of the main ingredients involved in the formation of ground-level ozone, which can trigger serious respiratory problems.

  • reacts to form nitrate particles, acid aerosols, as well as NO2, which also cause respiratory problems.

  • contributes to formation of acid rain.

  • contributes to nutrient overload that deteriorates water quality.

  • contributes to atmospheric particles, that cause visibility impairment most noticeable in national parks.

  • reacts to form toxic chemicals.

  • contributes to global warming.

Nitrogen Oxides and the pollutants formed from Nitrogen Oxides can be transported over long distances, following the pattern of prevailing winds in the U.S. This means that problems associated with Nitrogen Oxides are not confined to areas where NOx are emitted. Therefore, controlling Nitrogen Oxides is often most effective if done from a regional perspective, rather than focusing on sources in one local area.

Nitrogen Oxides emissions are increasing.

Since 1970, EPA has tracked emissions of the six principal air pollutants - carbon monoxide, lead, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds. Emissions of all of these pollutants have decreased significantly except for Nitrogen Oxides which has increased approximately 10 percent over this period

How can Nitrogen Oxides be Removed from the Environment?

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) is a proven and effective method to reduce nitrogen oxides which is an air pollutant associated with the power generation process. Nitrogen oxides are a contributor to ground level ozone. 

How does Selective Catalytic Reduction work?

SCR Systems work similar to a catalytic converter used to reduce automobile emissions. Prior to exhaust gases going up the smokestack, they will pass through the SCR System where anhydrous ammonia reacts with nitrogen oxide and converts it to nitrogen and water.

For more information on Nitrogen Oxides, Selective Catalytic Reduction, Nox Removal and SCR Systems,  or to advertise on the industry's leading websites:   call us at: 832-758-0027

 

* Some of the above information from the Department of Energy website with permission.


 

Cogeneration Technologies
Trigeneration Technologies
EcoGeneration Solutions, LLC
Copyright 2002   All Rights Reserved